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“How shall freedom be defended? By arms when it is attacked by arms, by truth when it is attacked by lies, by faith when it is attacked by authoritarian dogma. Always, in the final act, by determination and faith.”

― Archibald MacLeish

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Will Isaac Newton Find Love in "Love and Gravity"?

From Physics.org
From Physics.org
The BBC’s long-running science-fiction series Doctor Who centres on its eponymous character’s adventures through time and space. But could he really skip between different periods of history at will?
Travelling forwards in time is surprisingly easy. Einstein’s special theory of relativity, developed in 1905, shows that time passes at different rates for people who are moving relative to one another - although the effect only becomes large when you get close to the speed of light.
If one were to leave Earth in a spacecraft travelling at an appreciable fraction of lightspeed, turn around and come back, only a few years might have passed on board but many years could have gone by on Earth. This is known as the “twins paradox”, since a traveller undertaking such a journey would return to find herself much younger than her twin.
There’s only one problem from anyone wishing to get a glimpse of the future – getting back. It would mean travelling faster than light – and that’s not possible.
But there may be an out to be found in general relativity, Einstein’s theory of gravity that unites space and time as “spacetime”, which curves in the presence of mass. It allows for the possibility of wormholes – a kind of tunnel through spacetime connecting otherwise very distant parts of the universe.
If the “mouths” of the wormhole are moving relative to one another, then traversing the bridge between different points in space would also take a traveller to a different point in time to that in which she started.
However it would still be impossible to go back further in time than the point at which the wormhole was created, limiting the options for travel somewhat - and possibly explaining why we haven’t encountered any visitors from the future. If any natural wormholes were formed in the Big Bang, it might be possible to travel to a limited number of points in the past and in the distant universe, but wouldn’t enable one to flit around the cosmos at will as the Doctor seems to do.
Samantha Sotto is back with a new book, Love and Gravity. Revolving around the unlikely romance between Andrea Louviere and Isaac Newton (yes, THAT Isaac Newton). Here are some of the reviews of this new romantic novel:
From Goodreads:
“The author did a very good job to get time travel aspect to work. It doesn’t always work in books if it is not thought through or explained well but it was very well done in Love and Gravity. I loved how all the mysteries and elements… came together neatly in the end to make the story believable. The author cleverly weaved music, laws of physics and mathematics to create an interesting and a unique take on time travel.” – Milena, 4 out of 5 stars
“ Samantha Sotto did a fantastic job not only constructing this beautiful story, but giving two perspectives. I really love the unique angle she brings to life between the two characters. To understand, you’ll just have to experience the story yourself.” – Julianne, 5 out of 5 stars
“I enjoyed this strange, sweet novel about star-crossed lovers separated by circumstance and time… This time traveling love story was reminiscent of all the other time traveling love stories I’ve enjoyed over the years. But to me, that’s a good thing. Thoroughly enjoyed it.” – Heidi, 4 out of 5 stars
Harlequin Junkie
“Author Samantha Sotto certainly gave us readers an original, almost fanciful story that was filled to the brim with real and very raw emotions. And I think that’s what grounded Andrea and Isaac’s fantastical tale was that Sotto didn’t hold back on the awkward moments, the loss and grief they each suffered, or the glimpses of joy they shared. Everything was basically broken down into actions, consequences, and the resulting emotions.”
Just Me
“I have never before used the term “Tour De Force” in reference to anything before however I really feel like its the only statement that can properly fit how I feel about this book, it grabs you from the start and doesn’t let go I was holding my breathe without even realizing it for the last few pages. Overall I personally rate this book an 8/10.”

“Newton” by William Blake, original in the collection of Tate Britain. © Wikimedia Commons
From The Signature:
Imagining Isaac Newton: 5 Delightful Facts About the Famous Physicist
By SAMANTHA SOTTO
February 7, 2017
Editor's Note:
Samantha Sotto was born in Manila, Philippines, moved to the Netherlands as a teenager, and took up marketing at the Leiden campus of Webster University in the Netherlands. She later returned to the Philippines and graduated with an AB Communications degree from the Ateneo de Manila University. She then went on to pursue an almost decade-long career in brand management. Her new novel, Love and Gravity, is now available. She lives with her husband and two children, and Tennant, the world’s most adorable golden retriever, in Manila.
Mice. Magic. And pet doors. These weren’t the first things that popped into my head when I considered writing about Isaac Newton, but by the time I had finished my research about him my head was spinning with little else. While they didn’t fit into the picture that years of math and science class had painted in my head, they were the tiny, charming, odd-shaped, lost bits and pieces of a story that turned a legend into a man.
Mice and Mills
When Isaac was a boy, he noticed a windmill being built on a nearby hill. This spurred him to build a miniature version that ground corn using scrap wood and cloth sails. To make it run on windless days, he added a small wheel, powered by a mouse to turn the sail. Isaac’s “mouse miller” might have been ideal employee if not for his penchant for eating the fruits of his labor faster than he turned the mill’s wheel.
Mice. Magic. And pet doors. These weren’t the first things that popped into my head when I considered writing about Isaac Newton, but by the time I had finished my research about him my head was spinning with little else. While they didn’t fit into the picture that years of math and science class had painted in my head, they were the tiny, charming, odd-shaped, lost bits and pieces of a story that turned a legend into a man.
When Isaac was a boy, he noticed a windmill being built on a nearby hill. This spurred him to build a miniature version that ground corn using scrap wood and cloth sails. To make it run on windless days, he added a small wheel, powered by a mouse to turn the sail. Isaac’s “mouse miller” might have been ideal employee if not for his penchant for eating the fruits of his labor faster than he turned the mill’s wheel.
Lighting The Sky
Dark winter mornings were never a problem for twelve-year-old Isaac Newton. To light his way to school, he crafted paper lanterns that he could fold up and carry in his pocket. When it got dark, he lit his lanterns and attached them to the tail of a kite. Unfortunately, dancing lights in the sky weren’t exactly a common sight in seventeenth-century England and gave more than one of Isaac’s neighbors a fright.
Doors For Cats
The next time your pet lets itself out through your pet door, remember to thank Isaac Newton. The story goes that to keep from being bothered by the comings and going of a cat and her kittens, Isaac sawed two holes through a door in his room in Cambridge – a larger one for the mother and a smaller one for the kittens. You can guess what happened next. While this tale might be nothing more than an urban legend, there is a door in Cambridge that has two plugged holes that are about the size of a cat and a kitten.
School Struggles
We know Isaac Newton as one of the world’s greatest minds, but he had his share of difficulties in school. As a young boy, he languished at the bottom of his class and was once kicked in the stomach by a much larger student. Later, because his mother preferred that he become a farmer like his late father and refused to pay his tuition at Cambridge, Isaac was forced to become a subsizar, a servant to his wealthier schoolmates – a job that entailed chores such as waiting on his classmates during dinner, cleaning their boots, and emptying their chamber pots.
Dark Secrets
If anyone had found out what Isaac Newton had been up to in a dark shed at the edge of Trinity College’s gardens, he would have been hanged. Alchemy was a crime punishable by death and Isaac was devoted to its pursuit. He spent long hours producing alchemical creations such as The Tree of Diana and The Net. Isaac’s ultimate quest was The Philosopher’s Stone, a substance capable of turning base metals into gold. More importantly, the magical substance was said to bestow immortality. The endeavor consumed him and cost him his health. Posthumously, it was discovered that his experiments resulted in chronic mercury poisoning, a condition that could explain the deterioration of his health and odd behavior later in life.
Isaac Newton may not have found the alchemical recipe for eternal life, but his accomplishments in science and math secured his place in history. And while the full extent of his secret life is lost to time, it lives on in the pages of our imagination, making us wonder what exactly would make a man like Isaac Newton risk his life to live forever.
AMAZON Customer Reviews:
5.0 out of 5 starsThe Music, The Adventure, and The Infinite Tenderness...
By Autumn on February 7, 2017
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Andrea Louviere was destined to play the cello. Her father, a celebrated concert cellist, made sure of that. He taught her how focus her exceptional talent and about just how much power that music really has.
Even he couldn’t have imagined just how true his lesson would prove to be.
One day while practicing, her music opens a crack in her wall to reveal a beautiful boy with a smile that she can never forget. And so begins her desperate search for a way to see him again.
A mysterious man suddenly appears on her doorstep carrying letters from the boy beyond the wall. In his words, she finds strength to overcome her fears and a love that dares to transcend time.
Isaac Newton was historically known for being a loner. He never married and never committed to anything – other than science. But what history doesn’t know is that his heart belonged to a girl that he could never really have. The brief glimpses that he had of Andrea kept him going through a lifetime of solitude and sadness.
He would find a way to cross all barriers to tell her what was in his heart and maybe that would be enough to hold on to when even reason failed him.
But laws and hearts are meant to be broken and it’s a price that he will gladly pay for the beautiful girl made of magic and music.
I expected a sweet and simple love story when I began to read Love and Gravity. And what I experienced was something far different. Samantha has created a wildly passionate tale filled with such longing and heartbreak that I couldn’t hold back the tears. She blended the new and the old with poetic precision and I was completely swept away by the music, the adventure and the infinite tenderness. It’s a feeling that I know I won’t forget for a very long time…
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful and romantic book
ByTara on February 7, 2017
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I thought this book was beautiful. I swear the way Sotto writes I could hear music pouring through her words as the details she writes with became notes of art. Granted the idea of star-crossed lovers separated by circumstance and time. has been done before such as in the movie Lake House or the book Time Traveler's Wife but Sotto has most definitely put her own stamp on the idea using Isaac Newton as one of the love interests. It was obvious the author put some effort into researching Newton instead of just using the basics which made it more fun to google facts from fiction or play the what if game.
I recommend reading it with some cello music to really bring out the beauty of this story.
5.0 out of 5 stars Love and Gravity
ByElizabeth H. on February 7, 2017
Format: Kindle Edition
LOVE AND GRAVITY is beautifully written. I was completely enchanted by the whimsical story-telling. This is, in the true essence of the word, a romance. Not just of love, but of life and passion. It's reminiscent of The Time Traveler's Wife novel, but with a voice of its own.
The story is fictional, but I almost believed, or hoped really, that Isaac Newton was capable of such fierce passion. All the characters have so much depth and emotion. I experienced so many feelings and emotions as well. What Isaac and Andrea shared was an all-consuming love that defied space and time. I can't tell you how many times Ms. Sotto had me tearing up.
I'm more of a conventional happily ever after type of girl so I don't normally read this type of story, but I'm glad I took a chance. I'd definitely recommend LOVE AND GRAVITY to all readers. While reading, however, I do suggest you have plenty of tissues handy. This one's a tear-jerker!