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“How shall freedom be defended? By arms when it is attacked by arms, by truth when it is attacked by lies, by faith when it is attacked by authoritarian dogma. Always, in the final act, by determination and faith.”

― Archibald MacLeish

Thursday, May 5, 2016

It's Voters' Decision Time in The Philippines: Democracy or Dictatorship?

The Voters' Decision:Democracy or Dictatorship?
1986
The Philippines was praised worldwide in 1986, when the so-called bloodless revolution erupted, called EDSA People Power’s Revolution. February 25, 1986 marked a significant national event that has been engraved in the hearts and minds of every Filipino. This part of Philippine history gives us a strong sense of pride especially that other nations had attempted to emulate what we have shown the world of the true power of democracy. from philhistory
"I will declare martial law and shut down the 
Senate and Congress!"
Presidential bet Rodrigo Duterte said if he is elected president and fails to stop criminality in three months, he will resign and give the presidency to Sen. Ferdinand Marcos Jr.
"On a more personal level, I remember people saying how thankful they were for the relative peace and order that followed martial law." Bongbong 
From Inquirer:
Martial law abuses are a real election issue, especially for human rights victims, Liberal Party (LP) standard-bearer Mar Roxas said here on Saturday, contradicting vice presidential candidate Sen. Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. earlier assertion that it was a fabricated “media issue.”
“Perhaps for victims of martial law, this is not only an issue for media,” Roxas told reporters after a campaign rally here with his running mate Leni Robredo.
“They were the ones who were personally hurt, and many people who were not physically hurt still lost years [of their lives] because of martial law,” Roxas said.
He said the country itself lost years to martial law, including Filipinos who were forced to go abroad. “For our people, martial law is a real issue,” he said.
Marcos has been criticized by victims of martial law and their survivors for downplaying the atrocities committed during the dictatorship of his father, President Ferdinand E. Marcos.
Papayag ba tayo bumalik ang MARTIAL LAW?
Remember the 30, 000 Victims of Martial Law!
Rape; sexual assault; beatings; electrocution; enforced disappearances; being buried alive; shot in cold blood; hog-tied; water torture; solitary confinement; sleep deprivation.
The stories are as varied as the forms of torture, but these sordid tales all scream in pain; the cries reverberate beyond the confines of the prison cells and locked-up chambers of 44 years ago.
To this day, the thousands of victims of the military rule imposed on our country on 21 September 1972 still carry the marks of the torture they suffered in the hands of the military – rape; sexual assault; beatings; electrocution; enforced disappearances; being buried alive; shot in cold blood; hog-tied; water torture; solitary confinement; sleep deprivation.
The list goes on and on – and so does the memory of pain,sealed in the victims’ weary voices, their bruised hands, blank stares, burnt legs and the wounds that they carry. And to those who have disappeared, their loved ones’ empty nights of waiting desperately.
From New Internationalist
The student who dared to question Imee Marcos.
The photo shows Archimedes Trajano, a student of Mapua Institute of Technology who unfortunately met his end in the hands of Imee Marcos’ henchmen.
During an open forum at the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila, the then-21-year-old questioned Imee on her capability to lead the youth and told her that she only became the head of the Kabataang Barangay because she was the president’s daughter. He also questioned her on the human rights abuses being committed by her father.
On September 2, 1977, his crumpled body was strewn on the streets of Manila. The official explanation was that he had died in a frat rumble inside his dormitory. Witnesses however, said that Imee’s security dragged him away from the open forum. Trajano’s family successfully sued Marcos for civil damages in a Hawaii court; however, the local Supreme Court overturned it in 2006 due to a technicality committed by a lower court in trying to implement the prior verdict. From:filipiknow
What Martial Law was like
by Alan Robles (Hot Manila)
In 1972 Ferdinand Marcos declared Martial Law with Proclamation 1081. He did it, he said, to save the Republic and to create what he called a "New Society." A whole generation of Filipinos now exists which only has the faintest recollection -- if at all -- of the Marcos dictatorship. Kids, this is what you missed. Perhaps it's what you should pass on when you have kids of your own.
The lies. The biggest lie -- the mother lie -- was that Martial Law was imposed for the good of the people. It was not. It was imposed for the good of the Marcoses and their cronies, to keep them in wealth and unassailable power forever and ever amen. Marcos was a congenital liar: he lied about the state of emergency. He lied about his ill-gotten wealth ("what ill-gotten wealth?", he would ask amusedly."Tell you what, if you can find it we'll split it". Shows how reliable his word was). He lied about his war medals (almost all of them were fake), he lied about his father's wartime heroics (it turned out Marcos Sr was a collaborator executed by the guerrillas), he lied about his health. He lied about holding free elections and dismantling Martial Law. He lied and lied and lied. This was the man Joseph Estrada wanted to give a hero's burial.
The fear. Anybody could be picked up at anytime for any reason by the military or the police. You could wind up a detainee, or you could just vanish, a "salvage" victim. If you protested against the government, you were labeled a "subversive" or a "communist" or both and you were summarily arrested. People the government didn't like were tailed by security elements, their telephones tapped. 
The injustice. Only Marcos and his cronies, who plundered the economy, were protected by the law. Nobody else was. Arbitrary arrest, detention, salvaging and torture were the standard. The Defense Minister -- a man named Juan Ponce Enrile -- said in 1982: "We presume that priests and nuns charged with subversive activities are guilty until the courts decide whether they are guilty or not." On one occasion the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, someone named Enrique Fernando, servilely held an umbrella over Imelda Marcos' head.
The censorship. It was only when rebel soldiers finally seized a TV station in the EDSA uprising that people saw in their sets just how big the crowds were. Up until then the media were strictly controlled. Journalists who wrote against the regime -- most of them were women -- were routinely "invited" for questioning by the military. There was no transparency whatever. There were only three national broadsheets, the Times Journal, the Daily Express and the Bulletin Today, all of them offering the same pro-administration pap. The chief Marcos mouthpiece was a columnist named Teodoro Valencia. He died in 1986 and is now considered the "dean" of Philippine journalism. In 1983, when Ninoy Aquino was buried, at least one million people accompanied the funeral cortege as it wound its way through Manila. The next day, the Bulletin scarcely mentioned the story, instead playing up a story about a man struck and killed by lightning at the Luneta Park.
The corruption. There were suspicions about the Marcoses dipping into the public till. After EDSA, dazed investigators realized that the truth far outstripped the suspicions. The Marcoses had been screwing the public even before Martial Law. As early as 1968 Ferdinand and Imelda had already salted away more than $900,000 in Zurich accounts under the names "William Saunders" and "Jane Ryan." It was the initial deposit in what would turn out to be a mountain of loot. After having tracked down Marcos accounts and properties all over the world, investigators still aren't sure that they've found all the ill-gotten wealth.
The US support for the regime. The US loved their bases in the Philippines and put up with Marcos as long as they could. When George Bush, who was US vice-president then, visited Manila for a sham inauguration of Marcos, he proposed a toast to the dictator, saying "we love your adherence to democratic principles and to the democratic process."
Imelda Marcos speeches. They were terrible and they dragged on interminably. Among the things she said publicly: The Philippines is the center of the world, because that's the way it looks in a map. There's a cosmic hole in the Universe which shines radiation in the Philippines which Filipinos can tap to deflect intercontinental ballistic missiles. Her audience would applaud frantically. Cowards cheering a loony.
The arrogance of those in power. It was called a "smiling dictatorship" but the only one who was smiling was the dictator. Actually, his friends and family were also happy. When his cronies got into business trouble they were bailed out with taxpayers' money.