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“How shall freedom be defended? By arms when it is attacked by arms, by truth when it is attacked by lies, by faith when it is attacked by authoritarian dogma. Always, in the final act, by determination and faith.”

― Archibald MacLeish

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

The Unofficial Marcos Martial Law Museum

Remember the 30, 000 Victims of Martial Law!
Rape; sexual assault; beatings; electrocution; enforced disappearances; being buried alive; shot in cold blood; hog-tied; water torture; solitary confinement; sleep deprivation.
The stories are as varied as the forms of torture, but these sordid tales all scream in pain; the cries reverberate beyond the confines of the prison cells and locked-up chambers of 44 years ago.
To this day, the thousands of victims of the military rule imposed on our country on 21 September 1972 still carry the marks of the torture they suffered in the hands of the military – rape; sexual assault; beatings; electrocution; enforced disappearances; being buried alive; shot in cold blood; hog-tied; water torture; solitary confinement; sleep deprivation.
The list goes on and on – and so does the memory of pain,sealed in the victims’ weary voices, their bruised hands, blank stares, burnt legs and the wounds that they carry. And to those who have disappeared, their loved ones’ empty nights of waiting desperately.
From New Internationalist
Proclamation No. 1081 was the declaration of martial law in the Philippines by President Ferdinand E. Marcos. Once in effect, it covered the entire republic on September 21, 1972. It was announced to the public two days later.
Under the pretext of a staged assassination of his former Defense Minister Juan Ponce Enrile (now Senate President) and an ensuing communist insurgency, Marcos ruled by military power through martial law, altered the Constitution in the subsequent year, made himself both Head of State as President and Head of Government as Prime Minister, manipulated elections and the political arena in the Philippines, and had his political party--Kilusang Bagong Lipunan (KBL) (English: New Society Movement) control the unicameral legislative branch of government called the "Batasang Pambansa". All these allowed Marcos to remain in power. Wikipedia
September 21, 1972
Marcos signed the martial law order on September 21, 1972, but officially announced it to a shocked Filipino public two days later.
Newspapers and television stations critical of Marcos were shut down or taken over, while critics and political opponents were killed.
In his diary, Marcos wrote how his forces immediately arrested 52 personalities out of 200 targets, which included opposition figure senator Benigno Aquino – father of the current president.
“At 7:15 p.m. I finally appeared on a nationwide TV and radio broadcast to announce the proclamation of martial law, the general orders and instruction,” Marcos wrote.
“I was supposed to broadcast at 12:00 p.m. but technical difficulties prevented it. We had closed all TV stations.” From Inquirer
The Philippines During Martial Law
Proclamation of Martial Law: On September 21, 1972, President Ferdinand E. Marcos placed the Philippines under Martial Law. The declaration issued under Proclamation 1081 suspended the civil rights and imposed military authority in the country. Marcos defended the declaration stressing the need for extra powers to quell the rising wave of violence allegedly caused by communists. The emergency rule was also intended to eradicate the roots of rebellion and promote a rapid trend for national development. The autocrat assured the country of the legality of Martial Law emphasizing the need for control over civil disobedience that displays lawlessness. Marcos explained citing the provisions from the Philippine Constitution that Martial Law is a strategic approach to legally defend the Constitution and protect the welfare of the Filipino people from the dangerous threats posed by Muslim rebel groups and Christian vigilantes that places national security at risk during the time. Marcos explained that martial law was not a military takeover but was then the only option to resolve the country’s dilemma on rebellion that stages national chaos threatening the peace and order of the country. The emergency rule, according to Marcos’s plan, was to lead the country into what he calls a “New Society”.
Marcos used several events to justify martial law. Threat to the country’s security was intensifying following the re-establishment of the Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP) in 1968. Supporters of CPP’s military arm, the New People’s Army, also grew in numbers in Tarlac and other parts of the country. The alleged attempt to the life of then Minister of Defense Juan Ponce Enrile gave Marcos a window to declare Martial Law. Marcos announced the emergency rule the day after the shooting incident. Marcos also declared insurgency in the south caused by the clash between Muslims and Christians, which Marcos considered as a threat to national security. The Muslims were defending their ancestral land against the control of Christians who migrated in the area. The minority group organized the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) in Malaysia and pushed for the autonomy of Mindanao from the national government. From: philippine_history.
"Never Again!"
30, 000 Victims
MORE than 30,000 people fell victims to warrantless arrests, enforced disappearances, unexplained deaths and other excesses by the military during the almost 20-year imposition of martial law under the administration of the late strongman Ferdinand Marcos, whom two lawmakers wanted to be tagged as an “enemy of democracy.”
Records of these violations have been made public after the Department of National Defense (DND) and the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) on Wednesday turned over all documents pertaining to military operations during that dark period in Philippine history to the Commission on Human Rights (CHR).
CHR Chairman Loretta Rosales disclosed that she herself was among the victims of human-rights abuses.
“Our recorded victims were 10,000 but they were only few, they were the ones who filed a class suit. But beyond the class suit, many were nameless. Let’s say that those who were jailed reached over 30,000,” she said.
The declassified documents, according to Rosales, would give the public a general understanding of what happened during martial law and to the people who dared stand up against the iron rule of Marcos. From The Manila Times
NINOY:Martial Law and Imprisonment
The declaration of martial law on September 21, 1972 ushered in the defining phase in Ninoy's evolution as a leader. Before then, it was generally assumed that he would ascend to the nation's highest office as the Liberal Party's standard bearer in the 1973 presidential elections. Instead, he wound up the most high-profile political prisoner as Ferdinand Marcos suspended the Constitution,abolished Congress, silenced the opposition and the media, and ruled by decree on the pretext that he needed emergency powers to quell a communist insurgency and a Muslim secessionist rebellion.
While incarcerated in Fort Bonifacio, Ninoy managed to communicate with underground elements of the opposition who eluded arrest and to even have articles critical of martial law published in the foreign press. In an effort to break his spirit, Marcos had Ninoy and Senator Jose "Pepe" Diokno secretly brought to Fort Magsaysay in Laur, Nueva Ecija, where the two were placed in solitary confinement.
In these trying times, Ninoy began to question his faith as he wondered why God would allow him to suffer such indignity and injustice. Rejecting the authority of the military tribunal tasked to pass judgment on his guilt or innocence in the face of trumped-up charges of murder, subversion, and illegal possession of firearms, he went on a 40-day hunger strike that nearly cost him his life.
But, in the depths of his desolation, he realized that he had in fact been living a charmed life and felt shame at whimpering when his character was placed under its most severe test. There began a spiritual transformation that would see Ninoy evolve from a brilliant and ambitious politician to a selfless servant leader who surrendered himself to the will of God.
As expected, the military tribunal pronounced him guilty and sentenced him to die by musketry in 1977. However, the Marcos government could not carry out death sentence as its human rights record came under intense international scrutiny.From:ninoyaquino.ph
The Marcos' Martial Law Legacy
"On a more personal level, I remember people saying how thankful they were for the relative peace and order that followed martial law." Bongbong Marcos Junior
The photo shows Archimedes Trajano, a student of Mapua Institute of Technology who unfortunately met his end in the hands of Imee Marcos’ henchmen.
During an open forum at the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila, the then-21-year-old questioned Imee on her capability to lead the youth and told her that she only became the head of the Kabataang Barangay because she was the president’s daughter. He also questioned her on the human rights abuses being committed by her father.
On September 2, 1977, his crumpled body was strewn on the streets of Manila. The official explanation was that he had died in a frat rumble inside his dormitory. Witnesses however, said that Imee’s security dragged him away from the open forum. Trajano’s family successfully sued Marcos for civil damages in a Hawaii court; however, the local Supreme Court overturned it in 2006 due to a technicality committed by a lower court in trying to implement the prior verdict. From:filipiknow
"Ver, Marcos and the rest of the official family plunged the country into two decades of lies, torture, and plunder."
"From former Singapore Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew’s book “From Third World to First”